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The ultimate

I highly recommend the book ‘Shantung Compound’ by Langdon Gilkey. Although written in 1966 and perhaps a little dated, it deals with the ultimate.

It is an account of the 2,000 civilians interned by the Japanese in China during WW2 at a place called Weihsien. (Eric Liddell, the Scottish runner featured in the movie Chariots of Fire, died at Weihsien.)

It’s not a story of brutality but, as the sub-title says, ‘of men and women under pressure.’ Deprived of their liberty, they were forced to live with others, not of their choosing, in a confined space.

Fancy a cuppa

What an exciting morning last Sunday was with Dr. Ibrahim, the Grand Mufti, Mona Abdelraheem and many Muslim, Baha’i and Jewish friends joining us in worship.

There were many high moments.

Two stand out for me: Dr. Ibrahim relating the story of the prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) welcoming a Christian delegation to his capital and insisting they hold their worship service inside the mosque. (They had requested his permission to leave the mosque to worship, but he protested that they should stay and hold their service inside.)

Be the best Christian you can be

In his compelling book Saving Jesus from the Church, Robin Meyers writes about a ministers’ conference he attended in Detroit, where Nobel laureate and Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel, spoke.

‘Let me be clear about something. I’m not going to try and convert you to Judaism. I would appreciate it very much if you didn’t try and convert me to Christianity. I endeavour to be the best Jew I can be so that you can be the best Christian you can be.’

'Rejoice with me'

‘Rejoice with me,' said Jesus but the religious leaders grumbled.

Rejoice or grumble?

Last Sunday was a remarkable day. We rejoiced.

Around 30 Baha’i visitors attended our morning worship service, and our guest speaker, Professor Fariborz Moshirian, spoke eloquently about the inclusiveness of the Baha’i faith. (Each Sunday, in their services, readings are taken from the sacred books of every great religious tradition.)

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